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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
young guides in this natural environment, it's really given me a fresh energy. >> reporter: for these young tour guides showing visitors around the island they call home is also a great opportunity to grow up. >>> every year at this time scientists race to the antarctic. they use the small window of summer to study the frozen continent. more and more they're documenting changes they believe are linked to global warming. australian researchers have a strong presence at the south pole. they're essentially in their back yard. nhk world's takeo nakajima shows us what they're working on. >> reporter: it's summer in antarctica, and it's a busy time for animals, from penguins to scientists. experts at australia's four observation bases are hard at work, documenting climate change. th are ao seeing its effects firsthand. planes use ice runways to bring in researchers and goods. but those runways haven't been as reliable in recent years. when temperatures rise above minus 5 degrees celsius the surface begins to melt. that makes landing and taking off risky. 80% of flights planned in
in five years. >> susie: so is the slow growth environment coming to an end, or is the u.s. economy still stuck in neutral? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: ann lenane has sold real estate in up and down markets, what she says about today's market might surprise you. >> the real estate market is hot. it is on fire. >> reporter: her read on real estate market makes sense given that home sales and new construction are recovering from their recent steep declines. and, some economists believe housing will replace manufacturing as a key growth driver this year. beyond the housing, the economy has recently been showing other signs of strength. retail sales and manufacturing activity were surprisingly strong in december. today, we learned that jobless claims are at a five-year low. on top of that the stock market, often considered a leading indicator of the economy hit a five-year high today. we're not talking about any old high, it's the highest level for the s&p 500 since before the financial crisis. still, not all economists believe there's reason to celebrate, just yet. >> we've been loo
probably by investors, then suppliers, larger communities and the environment. they're all important. they all need to be taken into consideration. but i think the real secret sauce to a successful conscious business is prioritizing customers and employees. >> tom: one thing you have to deal with when talking about prioritizing customers is retail prices. food prices specifically. youeal with thesevery d directly. food inflation is moderated certainly from the big year-over-year increases we saw in 2011. it's been volatile, though. so how do you deal with that for your stakeholders, for your customers? >> there's not-- honestly, there's not that much you can do about it because if your raw cost goes up, you sort of have to pass those on. and i mean, i always think people misunderstand inflation because it's really just the currency depreciating and working its way out through all the different sections. if the federal government increases the money supply faster than productivity you're going to see inflation. and that's what we're seeing in food right now because the fed's been incr
to encouraging stewardship of the environment, land conservation, watershed protection and eliminating harmful chemicals. additional funding provided by: the colcom foundation. the wallace genetic foundation and by the charles a. frueauff foundation. >> this week on "to the contrary" first, children as human shields in the gun debate. then, who's leading the way for women in the workforce. behind the headlines: as we introduce you to some new female members of congress, this week it's arizona's kyrsten sinema. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to "to the contrary," a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, the gun debate rages on. children move to the forefront of the gun control debate as both sides use kids in their campaigns. first, the nra released a web ad accusing president obama of being a hypocrite. >> just another elitist hypocrite. >> that because he's skeptical of putting armed guards in schools while his daughters are protected by the secret service. then, flanked by children of all ages in the background, mr. obama signed 23 executive orders on g
a environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: its president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. >> s. >> from our studios in new york city this is charl captioning sponsored by rose communications >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most foft cuss was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bill its. and republicans in congress have two choices here. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills, or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not
. >> and i think in an environment where you have hundreds of millions of chinese on twitter, that increasingly are learning their government officials are worth billions of dollars. >> rose: basically you are saying their fear is legitimate. >> i think their fear is legitimate, i don't think the country is going to fall apart. >> rose: butery rong protesmoveme that has legs could provide a challenge over -- >> that's right. and they are so unwilling to risk that, they are so unwilling to tolerate even a little that they are likely to do two things, first, it will truly slow them on economic reform that is necessary and on any political reform to make a very conservative and cautious and they need to speed up and respond to these people and makes it much more likely the chinese will engage in nationalism, because if you are going to get mad at something in china you are going to have this information you can't stop the chinese from -- >> ros raise the natnalism ag. yes and thais really -- >> rose: write is the reason in places in europe you have a certain national link, natio
into a completely different environment. it's not an environment so different that all of these things are going to happen. and an assault weapons ban is sill a heavy lift. remember, the assault weapons ban we had had a lot of loopholes in it. but the other elements, it's just a different world. and i think national rifle association is no longer supreme in the same way and many of their own members i think are going to start to feel differently. when you get a joe manchin of west virginia coming out and saying "i hunt, i don't need more than three bullets in a magazine" and you get other long-standing strong proponents of the second amendment saying it's time for some changes, we're moving into a different world. >> brown: dad kopel, do you thinthe pliti have changed here or do you expect -- well, there certainly will be challenges legislatively. will there also be challenges legally? >> there will certainly be legal challenges because one important thing -- the way things have changechanged is we now have the supreme court having affirmed that the second amendment is an individual right and th
, at huge cost to both the environment and economy says energy expert kirit parikh. he tres the problem to policies that never really took into account the cost of power and gave it away to some consumers >> we started out with saying farmers should get cheap and free electricity. this was 30 years ago when we wanted farmers to really adopt more modern technologies, it was considered a good way to promote green revolution. >> reporter: power was distributed cheaply or free to farmers and other groups who's votes politicians courted. little effort was made to meter it. that prompted many people to hook themselves up, iegally. parikh says a third of all power is stolen off the grid. >> of the generated electricity is not charged to anyone. >> reporter: with little new money coming in, public utilities haven't been able to expand capacity or to buy enough fuel like coal or natural gas-- both in short supply anyway. power must be rationed but some regions overdraw their allotment. that can cause the system to shut down, or as it did last year collapse. but power failures are just the tip of
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)